SIGHTING/AIMING - STANCE/ALIGNMENT - BRIDGE HAND/ARM - BACKSTROKE/PAUSE - FOLLOW THROUGH/FINISH - "V" GRIP - MENTAL GAME - & MUCH MORE

© 2014 by Lee Brett 

The Cut Break - Az Billiards Article

October 13, 2014

The Cut Break

 

A few days after the Mosconi Cup, I was in Best Billiards hitting some

balls when a few people got chatting about the break and how the

Europeans had it mastered like an art. They continued about how the

Americans were really struggling to come to terms with it, not making

the 3 points for a legal break, as well as losing the cue ball.

For anyone who doesn't understand the 3-point rule, I will explain it

briefly. Every pocketed ball counts as a point and every ball that passes

the head-string also counts as a point. The breaker needs 3 points to

make a legal break; otherwise, control of the table is handed over to the

other team.

I was asked if I could explain why the Americans were struggling so

much with the break as well why the most important shot of the game

was in fact, the break.

I explained that it's my opinion that the break should have been

practiced religiously everyday before the cup until it was second nature

to the players. I'm not sure if the coach had done this, but it would be the

first thing on my list in preparing my team (as this is where the cup is

won and lost).

The difference with the break in the Mosconi Cup compared to most

other tournaments (especially where the American players are

concerned) is that the European players are used to the 9 ball being on

the spot and not the 1 ball (as it's played in the Mosconi Cup, Euro tour,

GB9 tour etc.).

The cut break is a controlled medium power shot, one tip of draw and

half a tip of outside english. The cue ball should come off the side rail

and out into the centre of the table. The wing ball (and balls behind the

wing ball) will be squeezed into the corner pocket and the one ball will

come off the side rail and up towards the top pocket.

Breaking with the nine ball on the spot requires a totally different break

technique. This, combined with the 3 point rule, made the American

players think they have to hit the balls harder with the cut break in order

to make the 3 points. This is a big no-no in my book as you lose the cue

ball. But, did they adjust and figure this out?

This made me ponder on whether the American team was much worse

than the European team at the cut break, or if the match was lost

elsewhere? So, I decided to study every break in the Mosconi Cup and I

came up with my own break-analysis for every player below.

I also ranked them with the following metrics:

 How I think they performed with their break compared to

their team mates

 If they hit the one ball too hard or too thin

 If they applied too much spin and lost control of the cue ball

 And how and if they adjusted to the break each day

Team Europe

Ralf - Day 1, 4 breaks - Too hard. Controlled. (touch too thin). Too thin.

Good break controlled.

Day 2, 5 breaks - Too thin (lucky). Good break. Too thin.

Lee Brett was born in 1974 in

Tranmere, on the Wirral, to english

parents, he grew up in Birkenhead,

England. Lee started coaching

snooker in 1993, and was also a local

snooker champion himself. Lee

helped numerous local players over

the years, and through his coaching

they went on to win many local

amateur titles between the numerous

players he taught.

In early 2009 Lee travelled to Canada

to coach snooker, where he was then

asked to coach Canadian Junior

champion John Morra at pool, he then

went to America in the summer of

2009, to teach pool after deciding to

switch from snooker.

Lee has coached and advised top

players John Morra, Shane Van

Boening, Darren Appleton, Mike

Dechaine and many others. Lee is

now known in his field as one of the

world's top billiard coaches, with a

record to match with the success his

players have achieved.

Lee's book the secret art of pool,

reached the #1 & #2 spot on the best

sellers list on amazon, his DVD by the

same name will be available in Mid to

late March 2012.

The Secret Art Of Pool - Is the 1st

instructional book by Lee Brett,

having coached and advised

numerous top players including

Darren Appleton, Shane Van

Boening, Mike Dechaine, John Morra

& many more. Lee has decided now

is the time to share these secrets in

his instructional book".

Covering his "V" grip technique, his 1

to 5 set up system, Inside & Outside

the box, how to have strong

fundamentals, including sighting,

alignment, stance, bridge hand & arm,

follow through, 100% aiming system,

and much more to mastering the art

of pool.

Lee's profile has risen rapidly in the

last 6 months, with his techniques

producing champion after champion

and receiving rave reviews for his

coaching ability. Lee's new website is

Too thin & hard (lucky). Good break.

Day 3, 2 breaks - Good break. Good break. (touch hard).

Niels - Day 1, 4 breaks - Controlled. (kicked unlucky). Controlled. Touch hard. Controlled (unlucky).

Day 2, 3 breaks - Good break (kicked unlucky). Good break. Too thin.

Day 3, 5 breaks - Good break touch hard. Good break (lucky). Good break. Too thin. Too thin.

Day 4, 4 breaks - Good break (unlucky). Too full. Good break (unlucky). Too thin.

Daz - Day 1, 3 breaks - Controlled. Too thin. Good break (kicked).

Day 2, 3 breaks - Too thin. Good break (unlucky). Too thin.

Day 3, 6 breaks - Good break. Too thin. Too full. Good break (touch left). Good break (touch left).Too thin.

Day 4, 4 breaks - Too thin. Too thin. Too thin. Good break.

Nick - Day 1, 3 breaks - Controlled (lucky). Good break controlled. Good break controlled.

Day 2, 6 breaks - Good break. Too thin. Too full (lucky). Too full, Too thin (lucky). Good break.

Day 3, 6 breaks - Too thin. Good break. Too thin. Good break. Good break (kicked). Too much spin.

Day 4, 4 breaks - Good break (touch too much spin). Good break. Too thin. Good break (touch too much spin).

Chris - Day 1, 9 breaks - Controlled (unlucky). Too thin (lucky). Too full. Too thin. Good break (unlucky). Touch too full (lucky). Good break. Controlled. Good break (unlucky).

Day 2, 5 breaks - Good break. Good break (unlucky). Good break (kicked scratch unlucky). Perfect break, Good break (unlucky).

Day 3, 4 breaks - Good break. Good break (kicked). Too thin. Good break.

Team Europe analysis Rank #1 - Chris Melling 72.22%

13 out of the 18 breaks he had were good or controlled, 3 were too thin and 2 too full.

#2 - Niels Feijen 62.50%

10 out of the 16 breaks he had were good or controlled, 4 were too thin, 1 was too full, & 1 too hard.

#3 - Nick Van den berg 57.89%

11 out of the 19 breaks he had were good or controlled, 5 were too thin, 2 were too full & 1 had too much spin.

#4 - Ralf Souquet 54.54%

6 out of the 11 breaks he had were good or controlled, 4 were too thin & 1 was too hard.

#5 - Darren Appleton 43.75%

7 out of the 16 breaks he had were good or controlled, 8 were too thin, & 1 was too full.

Team USA

Johnny - Day 1, 3 breaks - Too hard,. Too hard. Too hard & thin.

Day 2, 6 breaks - Good break. Touch too thin. Too thin (lucky). Good break. Too thin (kicked scratch). Good break.

Day 3, 2 breaks - Good break. Too full.

Day 4, 5 breaks - Good break. Too thin & hard. Good break (golden). Good break. Too much spin.

Mike - Day 1, 3 breaks - Good break. Too hard & too much spin (lucky). Good break.

Day 2, 4 breaks - Too hard & too much spin. Good break. Good break. Too thin.

Day 3, 6 breaks - Too hard & thin. Good break unlucky. Too thin kicked. Too thin. Good break. Too thin.

Shane - Day 1, 10 breaks - Too full. Too full. Too full (lost control scratched). Too hard & too much spin (lucky). Too hard & too much spin. Good break. Good break. Too full. Too thin. Controlled (unlucky).

Day 2, 5 breaks - Too thin. Too full Too much spin Good break (golden). Good break (unlucky).

Day 3, 5 breaks - Too much spin. Too much spin. Good break. Good break. Good break.

Day 4, 4 breaks - Good break (kicked). Too much spin. Too much spin. Too much spin (lucky).

Shawn - Day 1, 3 breaks - Too hard (lost cueball). Too hard. Too hard uncontrolled (lucky).

Day 2, 3 breaks - Good break. Too thin & hard. Too hard. also under construction, www.leebrettpool.com which will have a members section with access to videos on every subject in the game. Lee is also filming an instructional video for the US army and also his curriculum is going to be taught in numerous colleges in California, where Lee will also be the official coach for the worldppa. To contact Lee for lessons or to buy the secret art of pool, visit lee's website www.leebrettcoaching.co.uk Lee is available for national teams who want to take their players to the next level. Archive The Cut Break

Day 3, 6 breaks - Too hard. Good break. Good break. Good break. Good break. Too full.

Rodney - Day 1, 3 breaks - Too full (Scratch). Too thin & too hard. Too hard (no control).

Day 2, 4 breaks - Good break. Too hard & thin (kicked lucky). Too hard (lucky). Too hard (scratched).

Day 3, 2 breaks - Too thin & hard (scratched). Good break.

Day 4, 5 breaks - Too hard & too much spin. Good break (unlucky). Too hard & too much spin. Too much spin. Good break.

Team Usa Analysis Rank #1 - Mike Dechaine 46.15%

6 out of the 13 breaks he had were good or controlled, 5 were too thin, 2 had too much spin & power.

#2 - Johnny Archer 43.75%

7 out of the 16 breaks he had were good or controlled, 4 were too thin, 3 were too hard, 1 was too full & 1 had too much spin on it.

#3 - Shawn Putnam 41.66%

5 out of the 12 breaks he had were good or controlled, 1 was too thin, 5 were too hard & 1 was too full.

#4 - Shane Van Boening 37.50%

9 out of the 24 breaks he had were good or controlled, 8 had too much spin, 5 were too full & 2 were too thin.

#5 - Rodney Morris 28.57%

4 out of the 14 breaks he had were good or controlled, 3 were too thin & hard. 3 were too hard, 3 were too hard with too much spin & 1 was too full

Ranking table Europe and Usa combined #1 - Chris Melling 72.22% #2 - Niels Feijen 62.50% #3 - Nick Van den berg 57.89% #4 - Ralf Souquet 54.54% #5 - Mike Dechaine 46.15% #6 - Darren Appleton 43.75% #7 - Johnny Archer 43.75% #8 - Shawn Putnam 41.66% #9 - Shane Van Boening 37.50% #10 - Rodney Morris 28.57% Most scratches - Rodney Morris 3. Golden breaks - Shane Van Boening & Johnny Archer 1 each. So do I think was the mosconi cup won and lost on the break, not necessarily. But one thing it does show, the Europeans had a huge advantage over their American counterparts, and the cut break played a huge part of this. Chris Melling played the perfect cut break during his doubles match with Ralf, against Rodney & Shane. Here is the link forward to 9.05 - this is the perfect example of how to play the cut break with the 9 on the spot. Regards Lee Brett

All copyrights are owned by Lee Brett. No duplication is allowed without his permission.

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