THE TRAINING ACADEMY...

The online training academy will have free videos, material, drills & articles to help players of all levels. Lee will update this every week with lots of videos being made and added.

FREE VIDEOS

Secret Art Of Pool Preview

About The Secret Art Of Pool

 

One of the industry's most respected professional billiards instructors now has a DVD. In this 2 hour 25 minute DVD, Lee Brett shares his secrets.

 

The Secret Art of Pool DVD is a fantastic resource for pool players of all skill levels, taught by master billiards instructor, Lee Brett.

 

The Secret Art of Pool DVD establishes a strong foundation for players to rapidly improve their game, how to perfect the

  • "V" grip 

  • the 1-5 pre shot routine system

  • inside and outside the box 

  • 100% aiming system 

 

Whether you're a beginner looking to quickly improve your game, or are a advanced level player wanting to polish your skills this billiards DVD has something for you. 

 

 

 

The Fundamentals Of Pool

FREE TRAINING DRILLS

Why Should You Do Training Drills?
 
I prefer to call them challenges!
So why should we do challenges? by doing challenges we can track the improvement in our game and also have something specific to work on and more of a focus to your training, less equals more, we call this deep practice.
 
2 hours of focused training is worth more than 8 hours of banging balls around.

 

1/8

FREE ARTICLES

 

“THE CUT BREAK”

By Lee Brett.

 

 

A few days after the Mosconi Cup, I was in Best Billiards hitting some balls when a few people got chatting about the break and how the Europeans had it mastered like an art. They continued about how the Americans were really struggling to come to terms with it, not making the 3 points for a legal break, as well as losing the cue ball.

 

For anyone who doesn't understand the 3-point rule, I will explain it briefly. Every pocketed ball counts as a point and every ball that passes the head-string also counts as a point. The breaker needs 3 points to make a legal break; otherwise, control of the table is handed over to the other team.

 

I was asked if I could explain why the Americans were struggling so much with the break as well why the most important shot of the game was in fact, the break.

 

I explained that it’s my opinion that the break should have been practiced religiously everyday before the cup until it was second nature to the players. I'm not sure if the coach done this, but it would be the first thing on my list in preparing my team (as this is where the cup is won and lost).

 

The difference with the break in the Mosconi Cup compared to most other tournaments (especially where the American players are concerned) is that the European players are used to the 9 ball being on the spot and not the 1 ball (as it’s played in the Mosconi Cup, Euro tour, GB9 tour etc.).

 

The cut break is a controlled medium power shot, one tip of draw and half a tip of outside english. The cue ball should come off the side rail and out into the centre of the table. The wing ball (and balls behind the wing ball) will be squeezed into the corner pocket and the one ball will come off the side rail and up towards the top pocket.

 

Breaking with the nine ball on the spot requires a totally different break technique. This, combined with the 3 point rule, made the American players think they have to hit the balls harder with the cut break in order to make the 3 points. This is a big no-no in my book as you lose the cue ball. But, did they adjust and figure this out?

 

 

This made me ponder on whether the American team was much worse than the European team at the cut break, or if the match was lost elsewhere? So, I decided to study every break in the Mosconi Cup and I came up with my own break-analysis for every player below.

 

I also ranked them with the following metrics:

 

  • How I think they performed with their break compared to their team mates

  • If they hit the one ball too hard or too thin

  • If they applied too much spin and lost control of the cue ball

  • And how and if they adjusted to the break each day

 

 

Team Europe

 

Ralf – Day 1, 4 breaks – Too hard. Controlled. (touch too thin). Too thin. Good break controlled.

Day 2, 5 breaks – Too thin (lucky). Good break. Too thin. Too thin & hard (lucky). Good break.

Day 3, 2 breaks – Good break. Good break. (touch hard).

 

Neils – Day 1, 4 breaks – Controlled. (kicked unlucky). Controlled. Touch hard. Controlled (unlucky).

Day 2, 3 breaks – Good break (kicked unlucky). Good break. Too thin.

Day 3, 5 breaks – Good break touch hard. Good break (lucky). Good break. Too thin. Too thin.

Day 4, 4 breaks – Good break (unlucky). Too full. Good break (unlucky). Too thin.

 

Daz – Day 1, 3 breaks – Controlled. Too thin. Good break (kicked).

Day 2, 3 breaks – Too thin. Good break (unlucky). Too thin.

Day 3, 6 breaks – Good break. Too thin. Too full. Good break (touch left). Good break (touch left).Too thin.

Day 4, 4 breaks – Too thin. Too thin. Too thin. Good break.

 

Nick – Day 1, 3 breaks – Controlled (lucky). Good break controlled. Good break controlled.

Day 2, 6 breaks – Good break. Too thin. Too full (lucky). Too full, Too thin (lucky). Good break.

Day 3, 6 breaks – Too thin. Good break. Too thin. Good break. Good break (kicked). Too much spin.

Day 4, 4 breaks – Good break (touch too much spin). Good break. Too thin. Good break (touch too much spin).

 

Chris – Day 1, 9 breaks – Controlled (unlucky). Too thin (lucky). Too full. Too thin. Good break (unlucky). Touch too full (lucky). Good break. Controlled. Good break (unlucky).

Day 2, 5 breaks – Good break. Good break (unlucky). Good break (kicked scratch unlucky).

Perfect break, Good break (unlucky).

Day 3, 4 breaks – Good break. Good break (kicked). Too thin. Good break.

 

 

Team Europe analysis

 

Rank #1 – Chris Melling 72.22%

13 out of the 18 breaks he had were good or controlled, 3 were too thin and 2 too full.

#2 – Neils Feijen 62.50%

10 out of the 16 breaks he had were good or controlled, 4 were too thin, 1 was too full, & 1 too hard.

#3 – Nick Vandenberg 57.89%

11 out of the 19 breaks he had were good or controlled, 5 were too thin, 2 were too full & 1 had too much spin.

#4 – Ralf Souquet 54.54%

6 out of the 11 breaks he had were good or controlled, 4 were too thin & 1 was too hard.

#5 – Darren Appleton 43.75%

7 out of the 16 breaks he had were good or controlled, 8 were too thin, & 1 was too full.

 

 

 

Team USA

 

 

Johnny – Day 1, 3 breaks – Too hard,. Too hard. Too hard & thin.

Day 2, 6 breaks – Good break. Touch too thin. Too thin (lucky). Good break. Too thin (kicked scratch). Good break.

Day 3, 2 breaks – Good break. Too full.

Day 4, 5 breaks – Good break. Too thin & hard. Good break (golden). Good break. Too much spin.

 

Mike – Day 1, 3 breaks – Good break. Too hard & too much spin (lucky). Good break.

Day 2, 4 breaks – Too hard & too much spin. Good break. Good break. Too thin.

Day 3, 6 breaks – Too hard & thin. Good break unlucky. Too thin kicked. Too thin. Good break. Too thin.

 

Shane – Day 1, 10 breaks – Too full. Too full. Too full (lost control scratched). Too hard & too much spin (lucky). Too hard & too much spin. Good break. Good break. Too full. Too thin. Controlled (unlucky).

Day 2, 5 breaks – Too thin. Too full Too much spin Good break (golden). Good break (unlucky).

Day 3, 5 breaks, – Too much spin. Too much spin. Good break. Good break. Good break.

Day 4, 4 breaks, – Good break (kicked). Too much spin. Too much spin. Too much spin (lucky).

 

Shawn – Day 1, 3 breaks, – Too hard (lost cueball). Too hard. Too hard uncontrolled (lucky).

Day 2, 3 breaks, – Good break. Too thin & hard. Too hard.

Day 3, 6 breaks, – Too hard. Good break. Good break. Good break. Good break. Too full.

 

Rodney – Day 1, 3 breaks, – Too full (Scratch). Too thin & too hard. Too hard (no control).

Day 2, 4 breaks,– Good break. Too hard & thin (kicked lucky). Too hard (lucky). Too hard (scratched).

Day 3, 2 breaks, – Too thin & hard (scratched). Good break.

Day 4, 5 breaks, – Too hard & too much spin. Good break (unlucky). Too hard & too much spin. Too much spin. Good break.

 

Team Usa Analysis

 

Rank #1 – Mike Dechaine 46.15%

6 out of the 13 breaks he had were good or controlled, 5 were too thin, 2 had too much spin & power.

#2 – Johnny Archer 43.75%

7 out of the 16 breaks he had were good or controlled, 4 were too thin, 3 were too hard, 1 was too full & 1 had too much spin on it.

#3 – Shawn Putnam 41.66%

5 out of the 12 breaks he had were good or controlled, 1 was too thin, 5 were too hard & 1 was too full.

#4 – Shane Van Boening 37.50%

9 out of the 24 breaks he had were good or controlled, 8 had too much spin, 5 were too full & 2 were too thin.

#5 – Rodney Morris 28.57%

4 out of the 14 breaks he had were good or controlled, 3 were too thin & hard. 3 were too hard, 3 were too hard with too much spin & 1 was too full.

 

Ranking table Europe and Usa combined

 

#1 – Chris Melling 72.22%

#2 – Neils Feijen 62.50%

#3 – Nick Vandenberg 57.89%

#4 – Ralf Souquet 54.54%

#5 – Mike Dechaine 46.15%

#6 – Darren Appleton 43.75% – Johnny Archer 43.75%

#8 – Shawn Putnam 41.66%

#9 – Shane Van Boening 37.50%

#10 – Rodney Morris 28.57%

 

Most scratches – Rodney Morris 3.

Golden breaks – Shane Van Boening & Johnny Archer 1 each.

 

So do I think was the mosconi cup won and lost on the break, not necessarily. But one thing it does show, the Europeans had a huge advantage over their American counterparts, and the cut break played a huge part of this.

 

Chris Melling played the perfect cut break during his doubles match with Ralf, against Rodney & Shane. Here is the link forward to 9.05 - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JPvOEO3NQcI&feature=related this is the perfect example of how to play the cut break with the 9 on the spot.

 

 

Regards Lee Brett

 

 

"Aiming With The Feet"

By Lee Brett.

 

 

I was hitting balls recently at the derby city classic in Indianna, when one of the players Charles Morra came upto me and asked me what my secret was for shooting so fast and how I was so accurate.


“Playing snooker 8-10 hours a day for 15-20 years was the reason I told him”, his reply to me “that's not it” he says, “it's something to do with your feet, i've been watching you”. I then proced to tell Charlie, that I use my feet to aim.

 

So after the conversation with him, it got me thinking about my new article and all of the aiming systems out there, CTE, CTE Pro1, Ghost ball, SEE System, 90/90, etc etc... So Charlie this one is for you, and how I aim with my feet.

 

 

CTE (center-to-edge):

An offset and pivot system developed by Hal Houle based on the center-to-edge line (CTEL). The player offsets his/her eyes and cue from the CTEL in order to see the outermost-edge while pivoting the tip to the center of the CB. Shots within core CTE is generally separated into two catagories: Thick and Thin.

 

90/90:

An offset and pivot system developed by Ron Vitello based on three visual cue alignments (starting from the pocket-side, going from thick to thin): Edge-to-Edge (90/90), Edge-to-Center (90/half) and Edge-to-Reverse-Edge (90/Reverse90). The player offsets his/her cue to 1 tip within the inside edge of the CB (called the 90-position) aligned to either the identical position on the OB (90/90), the OB center (90/half) or the opposite position on the OB (90/Reverse90) and then hip-pivots to the center of the CB. The hip-pivot is a core component to the 90/90 system.

 

CTE-Pro1:

An offset and pivot system, developed by Stan Shuffett, which is based on Hal Houle's CTE and 3-angle aiming system. This system involves sighting the center-to-edge line (CTEL) along with a secondary aim line (primarily the left quarter, center, right quarter as well as the outside 1/8th). The shooter can either mechanically pivot (pivot while addressing the CB) with a 1/2 tip offset or air pivot (coming into center ball from the side) after offsetting their eyes.

 

Ghost Ball Aiming:

Aiming for the base of an imaginary ball that, when making contact with the OB, results in their "line of centers" pointing to the target pocket. At thinner cut angles, the ghost ball position must be adjusted to a thinner position to compensate for collision-induced throw. The ghostball position must also be adjusted to compensate for spin-induced throw.

 

 

Aiming With Your Feet:

When I started playing snooker many many years ago, I would just get down and shoot, not taking any thought on how I was aligned to the shot, or where my feet should be in relation to shooting the shot.

 

Then from watching hours and hours of live snooker of the greatest snooker players of all time, I started to take great interest in their stance and where there feet where, from here I started to experiment.

 

This all started after christmas one year when I was bought a 6ft snooker table, I was 9 at the time. I would play for hours on end trying to do it like the pros on TV.

 

At times I would get very frustrated at not being able to make the balls like they did, I would go back and watch them over and over, noticing they had very different styles. Some players where fast and exciting to watch, others extremly slow and very boring to watch for a 9 year old. But one thing they all had in common was there stance and how they aligned their feet.

 

I quickly realized if I wanted to be any good at the game I would at least have to stand very similar to the pro's.

 

The only place to put my new table was in our kitchen, which was very cold in the winter and hard to play for more than 30 minutes. So I asked my Mum and Dad if I could put the table in the back room, so I could see the TV while I played, this way I could try and copy the way they played while I practiced. They agreed to let me put it there, but only until it got warmer.

 

 

After watching the live snooker and my fav player Jimmy White, I then took on his fast style and started to work on my stance. I quickly found that this was the key to being a better player and I improved my high runs each week.

 

 

So you are probably wondering how do I aim with my feet. I will now explain how simple this is to do, but also how effective it is, if you place your feet in the correct postion for each shot.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

If you look at the diagram above, you will see the conact point on the 7 ball is marked with a line directly from the centre of the cue ball, and the path the cue ball will take to get on the 8 ball.

 

 

Every time I walk to the table I look at the shot from outside the box, roughly 2-3 feet from the table.

 

Outside the box the brain is switched on, here I find the line of the shot, decide how much speed, spin and position for my next shot.

 

Inside the box the brain is switched off and the sub-concious takes over. Here we just execute the shot, as we have decided everything we want to do outside the box.

 

By standing behind the line of the shot, slightly back away from the table (outside the box) we get a much clearer picture of the shot. We can now see the aiming line and where are feet should be in relation to the shot.

 

 

 

Outside the box

 

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 

Inside the box

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Inside the box

 

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 

 

Outside the box

 

 

Now here is how we aim this shot with our feet.

 

We stand behind the line of the shot with our body facing the object ball, we do this by walking into the shot, from outside the box. NOT by sliding our feet backwards and coming from inside the box.

 

A lot of players who have a major flaw in their game, will place the chalk down on the table, and slide back into the shot from inside the box, this is a big no no to aligning correctly. Start the pre shot routine by coming in on the cue ball from outside the box.

 

1- Stand behind the line of the shot, outside the box. This is where we find the contact point on the object ball, and find the line of the shot.

 

2- Once you are the correct distance from the cue ball, we now place our right foot on the aiming line of the shot, left foot if you are left handed.

 

You will notice that when you stand behind the line of the shot, you are slightly more to the side of your body that you shoot with, and not exactly aligned to the center of your body. (So right handed players should be aligned more to their right foot, and left hand players to their left foot.)

 

3- We now open our feet, this will open the hips up and get them out of the way, just like a golfer does when he is facing the golf ball, and place the opposite foot we shoot with (left foot for a right handed player, right foot for a left handed player) over to the side for balance, ideally shoulder width apart.

 

If you look down at your shooting foot, you should see that you have part of this foot on the line of the shot. Once you find which part of your foot is on the aiming line that feels the most comfortable, you can now use this as a reference to where your foot should be in relation to the shot.

 

 

Everytime I approach the table I stand behind the shot and find the line, I now step into each and every shot by using my feet as my aiming guide, as long as my feet are planted in the correct position I will now make the shot. If I don't plant my feet in the correct position and take care in doing this very important step of my pre shot routine, I greatly increase my percentage of missing the shot.

 

By using this method of aiming, my body is aligned correctly to the shot and I have a strong and stable base to shoot from.

 

So Charlie when I shoot each shot, I stand behind the cue ball visualizing the line of the shot, I now start with my right foot on this line and open my stance up and I shoot, its as simple as that.

 

This will become more and more natural the more you do it, and you can now place your feet where they should be without having to think about it. You will also get great feedback doing this, as once you are not standing in the correct position you will know, as it won't feel right. If this happens you need to get back up and start again.

 

Finally if we go back to the diagram above. I am a right handed player, so my right foot should roughly be in a line with where the 8 ball is, as the 8 ball is on the aiming line (contact point line).

 

Stand behind the shot, eyes on the object ball seeing the line of the shot. Now just open up your feet and shoot. It's that simple.

 

A very simple system to use, but also very very effective!!

 

Lee Brett – www.leebrettpool.com The secret art of pool

A big thanks to Dave Segal for the foreword on the other aiming systems.

more about you.

KICKING ACADEMY

Posted on AZBilliards forums by DeadAim

 

Here is an article posted on az billiards about the different kicking systems and how to use the diamond system. Along with learning how to kick naturally, this will give players a guide, as to where they need to aim on 1,2 or even 3 rail kicks. 

 

Group Class or One on One

If you would like to book Lee for an exhibition, group class or just a one on one lesson - Contact Lee now - lee@leebrettpool.com

1/13

SIGHTING/AIMING - STANCE/ALIGNMENT - BRIDGE HAND/ARM - BACKSTROKE/PAUSE - FOLLOW THROUGH/FINISH - "V" GRIP - MENTAL GAME - & MUCH MORE

© 2014 by Lee Brett